30 Dec 2012

Pt2.Ch3.Sb1 Somers-Hall’s Hegel, Deleuze, and the Critique of Representation. ‘Introduction.’ summary


by
Corry Shores
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[Note: All boldface and underlining is my own. It is intended for skimming purposes. Bracketed comments are also my own explanations or interpretations.]


 

Henry Somers-Hall

 

Hegel, Deleuze, and the Critique of Representation.

Dialectics of Negation and Difference

 

Part 2: Responses to Representation



Chapter 3: Bergsonism



Subdivision 1: Introduction

 

Very brief summary:

Part 2 examines Deleuze’s Bergsonist response and Hegel’s absolute idealistic response to the problem of representation.



Brief Summary:

Part 2, chapters 3 through 5, examine Deleuze’s and Hegel’s responses to representation. Deleuze’s response is largely influenced by Bergson, so much of the Deleuze material is Bergsonist. The chapter on Hegel examines his infinite thought and how he develops his absolute idealism through his examination of the limitations in Kant’s transcendental idealism.




Summary

 

In part 1 we discussed the problematic nature of representation in Kant’s transcendental idealism and in Aristotle’s and Russell’s hierarchical systems of classification. In this next part Somers-Hall (SH) will examine in more detail Deleuze’s and Hegel’s responses to those problems. Bergson is perhaps the most important of Deleuze’s influences. This chapter focuses on that influence. Deleuze is especially concerned with Bergson’s method of intuition and theory of multiplicities.

In making a sharp distinction between space and duration, Bergson was able to provide a theory of the foundations of classical logic, as well as explain why classical logic fails to explain large groups of systems, such as living systems. (69)

In the fifth chapter we examine how Hegel responds to representation with infinite thought and how he develops his absolute idealism “immanently from the limitations he finds in Kant's transcendental idealism. We will see how the introduction of the infinite into his conceptual schema allows him to resolve the problem of representation.” (70)

 

 

Somers-Hall, Henry (2012) Hegel, Deleuze, and the Critique of Representation. Dialectics of Negation and Difference. Albany: SUNY.

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