16 Jun 2018

Priest (5.1) An Introduction to Non-Classical Logic, ‘Introduction [to ch.5, “Conditional Logics”],’ summary

 

by Corry Shores

 

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[The following is summary of Priest’s text, which is already written with maximum efficiency. Bracketed commentary and boldface are my own, unless otherwise noted. I do not have specialized training in this field, so please trust the original text over my summarization. I apologize for my typos and other unfortunate mistakes, because I have not finished proofreading, and I also have not finished learning all the basics of these logics.]

 

 

 

 

Summary of

 

Graham Priest

 

An Introduction to Non-Classical Logic: From If to Is

 

Part I:

Propositional Logic

 

5.

Conditional Logics

 

5.1

Introduction

 

 

 

 

Brief summary:

(5.1.1) We look now at conditional logics, which are modal logics with “a multiplicity of accessibility relations of a certain kind” (82). (5.1.2) We will also consider some more problematic inferences involving the conditional.

 

 

 

 

 

Contents

 

5.1.1

[Conditional Logics]

 

5.1.2

[More Problematic Conditional Inferences]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Summary

 

5.1.1

[Conditional Logics]

 

[We look now at conditional logics, which are modal logics with “a multiplicity of accessibility relations of a certain kind” (82).]

 

Priest will now examine conditional logics, which are a “type of modal logic where there is a multiplicity of accessibility relations of a certain kind” (82).

In this chapter we look at what have come to be called ‘conditional logics’. These are a type of modal logic where there is a multiplicity of accessibility relations of a certain kind.

(82)

[contents]

 

 

 

5.1.2

[More Problematic Conditional Inferences]

 

[We will also consider some more problematic inferences involving the conditional.]

 

[In previous sections we have discussed conditionals (see section 1.3.2, section 1.6, section 1.10, section 4.5, and section 4.9) along with some problematic inferences involving conditionals (see section 1.7, section 1.8, section 1.9, section 4.6, and section 4.8.) Priest says now that our examination of conditional logics will involve also addressing some other problematic inferences concerning the conditional.]

The logics also introduce us to some more problematic inferences concerning the conditional, and we discuss what to make of these.

(82)

[contents]

 

 

 

 

 

 

From:

 

Priest, Graham. 2008 [2001]. An Introduction to Non-Classical Logic: From If to Is, 2nd edn. Cambridge: Cambridge University.

 

 

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