7 Nov 2014

Priest (P11) One, ‘And so . . .’, summary

 

by Corry Shores
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[The following is summary. All boldface, underlying and bracketed commentary are my own.]

 

Summary of


Graham Priest


One:
Being an Investigation into the Unity of Reality and of its Parts, including the Singular Object which is Nothingness


Preface


P.11 And so . . .



Brief Summary:

Priest’s book is based on three unorthodox philosophical concepts: dialetheism, noneism, and the non-transitivity of identity. But as we will see, these ideas mutually support one another, and there was never sufficient cause to consider them heretical in the first place.

 


Summary

 

Priest’s book is build upon three ‘heresies’:

the book draws on two views that are contemporary heresies: dialetheism and noneism. Indeed, it adds a third to the picture, in the form of the non-transitivity of identity. Some may think that only ill can come from compounding heresy upon heresy. Personally, I do not see it that way. The orthodoxies on these matters were never as rationally grounded as their adherents like to pretend. Moreover, in the present context, the three heresies, far from adding to each others’ woes, interlock and support each other in fundamental | ways. And in doing so, they open up a perspective of the world that is forever closed to those with the blinkers of orthodoxy.
(xxvii-xxviii)


Priest then goes on to thank schools and other institutes and as well many people who helped make the book possible. These people include Jay Garfield, Yasuo Deguchi, Amber Carpenter, Sarah Brodie, Maureen Eckert, Ricki Bliss, Dave Ripley, Naoya Fujikawa, two anonymous referees for Oxford University Press, Eric Steinhardt, and Peter Momtchiloff.

 

 



 

 

Priest, Graham. One: Being an Investigation into the Unity of Reality and of its Parts, including the Singular Object which is Nothingness. Oxford: Oxford University, 2014.



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