8 May 2018

Deleuze (1983.11.08.1) Course of 1983.11.08, part 1, “[On the True and False in Relation to Reality, Imagination, Essence, and Appearance]”

 

by Corry Shores

 

[Search Blog Here. Index tabs are found at the bottom of the left column.]

 

[Central Entry Directory]

[Gilles Deleuze, entry directory]

[Deleuze, Courses, entry directory]

 

[The following is summary and not translation. Please consult the original text, as my summarizations may be based on misunderstandings. Proofreading is incomplete, so I apologize for my typos and other distracting or problematic mistakes. Section divisions are my own arbitrary decisions, based mostly on topic groupings and partly on speech breaks in the audio.]

 

[The transcript contains the following misspellings;

Wells = Welles

Reisnais = Resnais

Stavinsky = Stavisky

Russel = Russell

Woringer = Worringer

]

 

 

 

 

 

Summary of

 

Gilles Deleuze

 

Course

 

1983.11.08

 

Transcript by Farid Fafa

 

Part 1 of 2:

1983.11.08.1

[On the True and False in Relation to Reality, Imagination, Essence, and Appearance]

 

 

 

 

Brief summary:

(1983.11.08.1.1) There is some pre-lesson banter. (1983.11.08.1.2) The title of the course could be: “Truth and Time: The Falsifier.” (1983.11.08.1.3) We will develop these themes of truth, time, and the falsifier by going along different lines of investigation. (1983.11.08.1.4) The first investigative direction is Herman Melville’s The Confidence Man. (1983.11.08.1.5) The second investigative direction is Plato’s battle with the Sophists. This will allow us to elaborate on the multiplicity of the falsifier. (1983.11.08.1.6) The third investigative direction is Nietzsche’s critique of truth. So we will replace the conventional notion of “truth” with the Nietzschean notions of the power of the false and the will to power. This topic is bound up with the odd relationship between the cinematographic image, time, and the falsifier character. We will also ask what makes the filmmaker herself a falsifier and not for example the playwright or literary author. (1983.11.08.1.7) The fourth direction of investigation is the importance of the falsifier for the time-image in cinema. The falsifier character has something to do with how time comes to no longer be subordinated to movement and now instead movement becomes subordinated to time. On this matter we will study three directors’ works that both feature the falsifier as well as the time-image, namely, Orson Welles (especially For for Fake / F comme Fake), Robbe-Grillet (especially L’homme qui ment / The Man Who Lies), and Resnais (especially Stavisky). (1983.11.08.1.8) The fifth direction of investigation is the scientific study of crystallography. We will approach this scientific literature with the aim of finding resonances between our philosophical conceptualizations with these scientific ones, such that through this encounter both fields can benefit by means of a mutual contribution, even though neither one will operate appropriatively toward the other. (1983.11.08.1.9) The sixth direction of investigation is the relation between the logical notion of description (as with Bertrand Russell’s account of description) with the film critical notion of narration (as with Robbe-Grillet’s notion of narration in his concept of the New Novel). We find narration being an actual component of the sonic and visual image especially in Mankiewicz, Rohmer, and Pasolini. (1983.11.08.1.10) We turn now to the notion of the true (le vrai) rather than truth (vérité). The true is not the real in contradistinction to the imaginary as the false. Nor is the true the essence in contradistinction to the appearance as the false. Rather, the true is the distinction between the real and the imaginary and between the essence and the appearance, while the false is the confusion between the imaginary and the real and between the appearance and the essence. What we call “error” is this confusion. (1983.11.08.1.11) The real and the imaginary in the image are not like two image-components. However, what are in fact parts of the image are two functional poles: the representative aspect and the soul-body modificatory aspect. We see both entangled in a sensation, for example. A sensation is an image because it can both represent something (for example, its cause) and it modifies our body and soul. Nonetheless, the distinction between the real and the imaginary still operates in the image, even if neither the real nor the imaginary itself are to be found in the image. For, the distinction between the real and the imaginary operates as the differential relation between the representative and modificatory functions of the image, respectively. (1983.11.08.1.12) The truthful person distinguishes the real (representative) from the imaginary (modificatory) aspects of the image. As such, a truthful person would not take their desire to represent anything, because desires are simply modifications. The mistaken person however would mistake their desires for reality. We can distinguish the true and the false in the following way: only the true has a form, and thus there is no form of the false. The mistaken person, however, does not confuse the form of the false with the form of the true (for the false has no form to begin with); rather, the mistaken person gives to the false the form of the true. (1983.11.08.1.13) Form is that which is universal and necessary with regard to something’s conception. The universality and necessity of a particular form are not so in actual fact (de fait) but only in principle (de droit). This is because the universality and necessity of a particular form are endowed as qualifiers of that form only by means of the affirmations operating in our judgments made about that form, with such judgments being involved in any conception of that thing. For example, when conceiving of the form of the human, we might make the judgment, “the human is a rational animal”. What is formal about the human is its rationality and animality, which by means of this judgment we affirm to be universal and necessary (and thus formal). In other words, when we conceive of the human being, it is impossible to deny its rationality and animality, because these are some of its universal and necessary features.  This universality and necessity are only so in principle and not in actual fact, in two senses: {1} it holds only for humans and not universally and necessarily for all forms whatsoever, and thus it is not universal and necessary in actual fact, and {2} the formal features actually hold only under the conditions and operations of the judgments made while conceiving the form. So a triangle has three angles necessarily and universally, but that necessity and universality come to affectively qualify the triangle only when we affirm this as a formal property of triangles by means of the judgments involved in our conceptualization of triangles. In other words, just because the form of a triangle in principle includes universally and necessarily that it has three angles does not mean that in actual fact every person is always thinking about triangles and their number of sides. That affirmation of universal and necessary features is something that comes into play only when it is conceived, even though these features are always there in principle. As we said above, only the true has a form, and so the false lacks form. Now that we have defined form as the universality and necessity that is affirmed of something by means of a judgment formed in its conceptualization, we can further distinguish the true from the false in the following way: the true is that which is affirmed in a judgment made while conceptualizing something, with those affirmed features being universal and necessary formally in principle, and the false is that which is affirmed in some such judgment, with those affirmed features not being universal and necessary formally in principle. For example, the true in “the human is a rational animal” would be the rationality and animality being undeniable in every conception of the human, while the false in “the human is a moral animal” would be the morality being deniable in some conceptions – or maybe even in all conceptions – of the human being. (1983.11.08.1.14) The variations in the world of images that are somehow bound up with their respective forms can be understood either as {1} modifications (being accidental alterations to the universal and necessary features of the respective form), as {2} appearances (being impure and misleading presentations of the respective form), or as {3}  the imaginary (having a status of not being the real form but rather some sensory presentation of one.) According to a classical philosophical perspective, the truth is never presented in its unadulterated form, standing out already from the modificatory aspects of the image. Rather, it must be extracted. To make that extraction, we must distinguish in the world of images two poles: {1} the representative pole, which renders to us the real and the essences, and {2} the modificatory pole, which makes us fall back into the imaginary and into the appearance. The truthful person is the one who only allows themselves to be modified by the form and thus by the true and sets aside the modifications to their mind and soul coming from the non-formal, sensory parts of the image. But for our soul to be modified by the formal and true means for it to be veridically informed by true givens. (1983.11.08.1.15) The true’s modification of our soul and our soul’s allowing only the true form to modify it is the organic activity of human beings, and the veridical representation of the form in the images we perceive and create is organic representation. This organic element is elaborated by Worringer. Because the true is the form which is itself the universal and necessary, we seem to have stripped time away from the true by making forms eternal, despite the paradoxes this engenders.

 

 

 

 

 

Contents:

 

1983.11.08.1.1

[Pre-Lesson Material]

 

1983.11.08.1.2

[The Course as Entitled: “Truth and Time: The Falsifier”]

 

1983.11.08.1.3

[Our Multiple Directions of Investigation: Truth, Time, and the Falsifier]

 

1983.11.08.1.4

[Investigation 1: Herman Melville’s The Confidence Man]

 

1983.11.08.1.5

[Investigation 2: Plato and the Sophists]

 

1983.11.08.1.6

[Investigation 3: Nietzsche’s Critique of Truth (The Power of the False and The Will to Power)]

 

1983.11.08.1.7

[Investigation 4: The Relation of the Time-Image to the Falsifier in Welles, Resnais, and Robbe-Grillet]

 

1983.11.08.1.8

[Investigation 5: Crystallography]

 

1983.11.08.1.9

[Investigation 6: Description and Narration. (Bertrand Russell’s Notion of Description. Robbe-Grillet’s Notion of the New Novel. Narration as an Image-Component in Mankiewicz, Rohmer, and Pasolini.)]

 

1983.11.08.1.10

[The True as the Distinction between Real and Imaginary; and between Essence and Appearance. The False as their Confusion. Error as this Confusion.]

 

1983.11.08.1.11

[The Distinction between the Real and the Imaginary as Operating in the Image by Means of their Corresponding Distinction between the Representative and Modificatory Functional Poles of the Image]

 

1983.11.08.1.12

[The True as Having a Form and the False as Lacking One. The Truthful Person as Maintaining the Distinction between the Real (the Representative) and the Imaginary (the Body/Soul Modificatory) Aspects of the Image. The Mistaken Person as Giving the False the Form of the True.]

 

1983.11.08.1.13

[Form as Universality and Necessity, Endowed by Means of Affirmational Judgments. The True and the False in Terms of Formal Universality and Necessity.]

 

1983.11.08.1.14

[The Extraction of the True and the Formal from the Image by Neglecting the Modificational. The Truthful Person as Allowing Their Soul to Be Only Veridically Informed by True Givens.]

 

1983.11.08.1.15

[Organic Representation. The Eternality of Forms.]

 

Bibliography

 

 

 

 

 

Summary

 

1983.11.08.1.1

[Pre-Lesson Material]

 

00.00-03.55

“Maintenant moi, les problèmes de droit me passionnent ... pas à dix heures et demie.”

 

[There is some pre-lesson banter.]

 

[Prior to beginning with his lesson material, Deleuze makes some comments about the classroom, smoking, timing, etc., telling jokes all the while.]

[contents]

 

 

 

 

1983.11.08.1.2

[The Course as Entitled: “Truth and Time: The Falsifier”]

 

04.00-04.40

“Alors, si j’essayais de donner un titre ... Vérité et temps : le faussaire ”

 

[The title of the course could be: “Truth and Time: The Falsifier.”]

 

[Deleuze says that we might give the title “Truth and Time: The Falsifier” for what he aims to accomplish in this course. (I am using Daniel Smith’s translation for the term le faussaire. See Smith 2012, p.139.)

Alors, si j’essayais de donner un titre, par commodité, à ce que je vous propose de faire cette année, ce serait, ça répondrait exactement à, à peu près exactement à :

→ Vérité et temps : le faussaire.

(Voix 04.00-04.40)

[contents]

 

 

 

1983.11.08.1.3

[Our Multiple Directions of Investigation: Truth, Time, and the Falsifier]

 

04.40-07.07

“Alors immédiatement bon et bien du coup ... on le découvrira petit à petit.”

 

[We will develop these themes of truth, time, and the falsifier by going along different lines of investigation.]

 

[But we wonder, why would we relate the falsifier to the problem of truth and time? These issues as we can see put together different directions of inquiry. Deleuze then makes some practical comments. (I do not follow all of this. I am guessing he is saying that because the course topic can take us in various directions, we would want people with different backgrounds and interests to interrupt and open new paths of development. It then seems he comments that for this to work, you need the right sort of classroom, and an amphitheater would not allow for such disjunctive developments.]

Alors immédiatement bon et bien du coup on est lancé, parce que vérité et temps le faussaire, pourquoi que le faussaire il serait lié à un problème de la vérité et du temps ? Si bien que cet ensemble de notions évidemment est censé grouper un certain nombre de directions de recherches. Et j’aimerai bien là contrairement aux autres années où les directions de recherches que nous avions, on les découvrait au fur et à mesure, je voudrais en indiquer quelques unes dans un but pratique.

Je rêverais que soit par groupe par individualité, donc par groupe de un ou de plusieurs, indépendants ou groupés, vous vous engagez (pas dans toutes ces directions de recherches ça m’intéresserait pas, ça serait trop) mais que d’après si quelque chose vous intéresse et si vous venez plutôt si vous revenez c’est que quelque chose vous aura intéressé, que certains d’entre vous voient, aillent dans telle direction, alors j’aimerai bien que vous vous disiez, « et bien ça je vais m’y mettre pendant, alors là du coup indépendamment de moi, et comme vous l’auriez fait indépendamment de moi, vous m’apporteriez d’autant plus. Je précise, quoiqu’on ne me l’ai pas demandé, que si je ne veux vraiment pas aller en amphithéâtre c’est parce que je souhaite toujours que il n’y ait pas de problème quant aux interventions de quelqu’un, quand il souhaite m’interrompre, quand il souhaite apporter quelque chose tout ça, et que dans les conditions d’un amphithéâtre cela est impossible.

Alors je dis les directions de recherche, sans ordre hiérarchique du tout, qui nous occuperons cette année - peu importe pour le moment qu’on ne voit pas pourquoi c’est lié à mon sujet, on le découvrira, on le découvrira petit à petit.

(Voix 04.40-07.07)

[contents]

 

 

 

 

1983.11.08.1.4

[Investigation 1: Herman Melville’s The Confidence Man]

 

07.07-8.58

“Je voudrais pour ceux que ça intéressent que ... Melville ça m’intéresserait beaucoup. ”

 

[The first investigative direction is Herman Melville’s The Confidence Man.]

 

[One direction of investigation is Herman Melville’s The Confidence Man. Deleuze will pay particular attention to this text.]

Je voudrais pour ceux que ça intéressent que, et je compte m’appuyer beaucoup sur un romancier Américain célèbre, un romancier Américain qui s’appelle Hermann Melville. Donc tous ceux que cette direction de recherche intéressent je leur demande de lire ou relire Melville et particulièrement s’ils le peuvent, un livre de Melville qui est hélas le moins connu en France, qui à été traduit sous le titre “Le grand escroc”. Et dont le titre Anglais est, vous connaissez d’avance ma prononciation déplorable "The confidence man". Je ne sais pas comment on pourrait le traduire c’est pas par hasard que le traducteur Français qui est très bon, l’a traduit “le grand escroc”, et en effet la formule le grand escroc apparaît dans le roman mais “Confidence man” je ne verrai pour traduire qu’avec un trait d’union : l’homme-confiance. Bien évidemment ce n’est pas l’homme de confiance, le personnage... Hélas ce livre est introuvable parce qu’il est épuisé et n’est pas réédité en français, ceux qui lisent l’anglais n’auront pas de difficulté. Donc vous ne pouvez le trouver que si vous avez un ami qui l’a - il y a quand même beaucoup de gens qui l’ont, ou bien en le lisant ou en l’empruntant à une bibliothèque.
→ Voila une première direction, Melville ça m’intéresserait beaucoup.

(Voix 07.07-8.58)

[contents]

 

 

 

 

1983.11.08.1.5

[Investigation 2: Plato and the Sophists]

 

9.00-15.30

“Deuxième direction : Platon... bon voila, deuxième direction Platon. ”

 

[The second investigative direction is Plato’s battle with the Sophists. This will allow us to elaborate on the multiplicity of the falsifier.]

 

[The next direction of investigation is Plato’s relation to the Sophists. We find his writings on the Sophists in five books: Protagoras, GorgiasGreater Hippias, Lesser Hippias (the fifth is one not mentioned, but later he talks about The Sophist). But can we really speak of the Sophists as if they were a group that shared fundamental views? Eugene Dupréel wrote an excellent book on the Sophists where he distinguishes such that they should not all be understood as falling under one umbrella. (See Dupréel 1948 in the Bibliography section below.) We will consider the Sophists in terms of the falsifier, because the falsifier should be understood not as one person but as a multiplicity. But the truthful person is also multiple in the sense that there are many of them, yet they all testify to the form of the One (for, they believe in an ultimate truth while the falsifier multiplies reality.) So in principle there can be only one truthful person, even though there are in actual fact many of them. However, even if we only found one falsifier in actual fact, there still would be many falsifiers in principle. (I do not know where we are going yet, but I wonder if there is a temporal connection here. Suppose you have in fact just one falsifier. How would there be many in principle? It would seem that either the one falsifier is at any moment somehow a multiplicity, like a split personality, or that over time she multiplies, like going through a chain of self-variations. In other words, falsification is temporalization, because it is generative of the newness needed for the advancement of time, understood perhaps in a Bergsonian sense.)]

→ Deuxième direction : Platon, mais pas n’importe quel Platon, je remarque que il est célèbre que entre Platon et ce qu’on appelle les sophistes il y a une longue guerre interminable, que Platon poursuit à travers toute son œuvre. Je remarque aussi que, on a vite fait nous, lecteurs, qui sommes si loin, si loin là de toutes ces histoires des Grecs. Nous lecteurs nous avons vite fait de parler “des sophistes” d’une part et d’autre part de Socrate et de Platon. Mais des qu’on lit d’un peu plus près et même des commentateurs de Platon, très sérieux il me semble, on parle des sophistes comme si il y avait une unité. Je remarque que Platon traite ses problèmes avec les sophistes et même sa guerre avec les sophistes en fonction de cinq grands textes, trois d’entre eux ont pour titre les noms des trois plus grands sophistes, qui nous sont parvenus – parce qu’il ne nous est pas parvenu grand-chose.
→ L’un s’appelle, l’un de ces dialogues de Platon s’appelle : Le Protagoras,
→ l’autre s’appelle : Le Gorgias,
→ et l’autre à vrai dire il y en a deux s’appelle L’Hippias, Hippias mineur et Hippias majeur, il n’y a pas deux Hippias mais il y a deux dialogues de Platon. Je dis donc voila trois sophistes : Protagoras, Gorgias, Hippias.

Si on lit avec attention, et ça pourrait être un but de vos recherches, ceux qui prendraient cette direction, si on lit avec attention les dialogues de Platon, on s’aperçoit que Protagoras, Gorgias et Hippias, ne sont pas du tout trois cas d’une même figure, qu’ il y a entre eux de très grandes différences. Il devient donc difficile de parler du sophiste, il faut parler des sophistes, est ce que ce pluriel a une importance, est ce que c’est le même pluriel que lorsque je dis : les Platoniciens ? Faudrait voir les pluralités propres aux sophistes, bien... Un philosophe Belge du début de ce siècle qui s’appelait Eugène Dupreel qui est devenu très peu connu, qui a fait une œuvre à mon avis très insolite, très intéressante, a écrit un des meilleurs livre sur les sophistes qui soit et à ma connaissance c’est le seul à avoir fait une étude sérieuse sur la possibilité de distinguer Protagoras, Gorgias, Hippias et de ne pas les confondre sous un concept vide de « sophistes ». A ces trois dialogues de Platon, donc où notre lecture peut être guidée par Dupreel, se joindraient deux grands dialogues encore de Platon, l’un intitulé “Le Sophiste”, mais où justement le sophiste est présenté comme un maître protéiforme et “Le Politique”. Je suppose certains d’entre vous qui prendraient cette direction de recherche tout comme ceux qui se lanceraient dans Melville, ils en auraient pour l’année et cela leur aurait apporté au moins quelque chose, la lecture d’un génie littéraire aussi grand ou la relecture – parce que mon souci c’est que ce soit pas une lecture comme ça – qu’elle soit vraiment vue d’un certain point de vue qui est précisément le point de vue que je vous propose : vérité/ temps : le faussaire.

Bien de même pour Platon, si dans votre année vous aviez lu ce texte de Platon d’un certain point de vue, quel point de vue ? Evidemment le faussaire puisque le sophiste dans sa pluralité même, qui fait qu’on hésite sur le, sur l’article « le » est présenté comme le faussaire et c’est pour ça qu’il n’est pas “un” mais pourquoi le faussaire ne peut il pas être un, pourquoi est ce qu’il ne peut pas y avoir qu’un faussaire et un seul ? Bon quelle est la pluralité exigée par la notion de faussaire ? Là on tient déjà un problème [...] on sait même pas ce qu’il veut dire.

Remarquez que je conçois ce que veut dire [...] ce n’est pas au niveau des sentiments, si on me dit l’homme véridique, je comprends vaguement, l’homme véridique ah oui !, l’homme véridique bien sur il y en a plusieurs. Mais chaque homme véridique témoigne pour une forme qui est la forme de l’Un. Le faussaire comment témoignerait il pour une forme qui serait la forme de l’Un ? Donc peut être que s’il y a plusieurs hommes véridiques en fait, il n’y en a qu’un en droit, tandis que même si il n’y a qu’un faussaire en fait, il y en a plusieurs en droit. Et que les deux propositions ne sont pas simplement inverses c’est que un et plusieurs n’ont évidemment pas le même sens dans les deux cas, bon voila, deuxième direction Platon.

(Voix 09.00-15.30)

[contents]

 

 

 

 

1983.11.08.1.6

[Investigation 3: Nietzsche’s Critique of Truth (The Power of the False and The Will to Power)]

 

15.33-20.15

“Troisième direction : Nietzsche. ... je sais plus ce que je veux dire. ”

 

[The third investigative direction is Nietzsche’s critique of truth. So we will replace the conventional notion of “truth” with the Nietzschean notions of the power of the false and the will to power. This topic is bound up with the odd relationship between the cinematographic image, time, and the falsifier character. We will also ask what makes the filmmaker herself a falsifier and not for example the playwright or literary author.]

 

[The third direction of investigation is Nietzsche, and in particular two of his works, namely The Twilight of the Idols and Beyond Good and Evil. And in addition to these two is Thus Spoke Zarathustra. The Twilight of the Idols and Beyond Good and Evil are particularly important for our purposes here is because it is in these texts that Nietzsche pushes one of his most fundamental discoveries the furthest, namely, the questioning of the problem of truth, claiming even to be the first to really question truth itself. Instead of thinking in terms of truth, we should use the concepts of the power of the false or the will to power. Now, while this third direction of research is bound up with the others, still as a student we should decide which direction best suits our interest and work. This third direction develops our ongoing inquiry into the bizarre relation between the cinematographic image, time, and the falsifier. We ask, why is the falsifier a fundamental character in cinema? It is a question also of asking why the filmmaker would be more of a falsifier than playwright or a literary author. The film journal Cahiers du cinéma had recently published a number of short but excellent texts on the relationship between cinema and the power of the false. (Following this observation there seems to have been a disturbance of some sort in the room, maybe involving someone trying to get into the room or something else, leading to some brief banter and joking.)]

→ Troisième direction : Nietzsche. Là aussi il s’agirait pas de lire tout Nietzsche, il s’agirait de lire avant tout deux textes, plus tout ceux que vous voudriez : “Le Crépuscule des idoles” et “Par delà le bien et le mal”. Pourquoi ? Adjonction nécessaire pour ceux qui ne l’ont pas fait, de toute manière il faut l’avoir lu, puisque c’est un des grands textes de l’humanité “Ainsi parlait Zarathoustra”. Ceci dit pourquoi ces deux textes Crépuscules des idoles et Par delà le bien et le mal ? C’est parce que c’est dans ces deux textes que Nietzsche prétend poser et pousser le plus loin ce qu’il appelle une de ses découvertes les plus fondamentales à savoir la mise en question du problème de la vérité : « je suis le premier à avoir mis en question la vérité ». Pourquoi ? Pour la remplacer par quelque chose qu’il faudra bien appeler tantôt puissance du faux tantôt volonté de puissance. Troisième aspect, troisième direction de recherche, elles se distinguent pas, on aura pas un chapitre sur ceci un chapitre sur cela etc. Elles se mélangeront toutes ces directions, mais encore faut il encore une fois ce que je vous demande c’est de prendre l’une celle qui vous convient le mieux ou qui coïncide avec votre propre travail.

→ Troisième direction de recherche pour ne pas nous sortir de ce qu’on fait depuis deux ans, c’est quel est le rapport bizarre entre l’image cinématographique, le temps et le faussaire ? Pourquoi est ce que le faussaire est un personnage fondamental... du point de vue du cinéma ? Sans doute parce que d’une certaine manière il est la réflexion du metteur en scène lui-même, bon mais, mais en quoi le metteur en scène, en quoi l’auteur de cinéma serait il un faussaire plus qu’un auteur de théâtre, plus qu’un auteur de littérature ? Y a-t-il entre le cinéma et la puissance du faux ? les “Cahiers du cinéma” récemment ont consacré de courts textes mais très bons à la puissance du faux – est ce qu’il y a un rapport, un rapport particulier entre ? Alors vous comprenez c’est très curieux ça, pourquoi ? Je cite quelques auteurs, tien s...bruit dans la salle.

Un élève :

→ égoïste ! Gilles Deleuze :

→ Qu’est ce qu’il dit ? Un élève :-« égoïste ». Une élève : jaloux Rires dans la salle. Qu’il entre ! ouvrez lui. Oui il suffit de dire ça...je sais plus ce que je veux dire.

(Voix 15.33-20.15)

[contents]

 

 

 

1983.11.08.1.7

[Investigation 4: The Relation of the Time-Image to the Falsifier in Welles, Resnais, and Robbe-Grillet]

 

20.15-28.48

“C’est quand même curieux cette présence, ... Voila donc une autre direction de recherche. ”

 

[The fourth direction of investigation is the importance of the falsifier for the time-image in cinema. The falsifier character has something to do with how time comes to no longer be subordinated to movement and now instead movement becomes subordinated to time. On this matter we will study three directors’ works that both feature the falsifier as well as the time-image, namely, Orson Welles (especially For for Fake / F comme Fake), Robbe-Grillet (especially L’homme qui ment / The Man Who Lies), and Resnais (especially Stavisky).]

 

[Deleuze then notes a short film by Godard, called “Le grand escroc” collected among other short films in Les plus belles escroqueries du monde (1964). Although “Le grand escroc” takes the same title as the translation of Melville’s The Confidence Man, it does not reproduce Melville’s story but rather takes inspiration from part of it. The issue of the falsifier will be found in Welles, Resnais, and Robbe-Grillet. (At this point there is more disturbance it seems from the person outside the door.) These three directors are notable for their cinematic study of time itself, in that they are the three creators of the time-image. They reversed the relation between time and movement, where no longer is time subordinated to movement (as its measure) but rather movement becomes subordinated to time. Deleuze wonders, can it really be a coincidence that these three inventors of the time-image also happen to be the ones who set forth the theme of the falsifier? It is on account of this probable link that the course is properly entitled, “Truth and Time: The Falsifier.” We must ask what is it about time itself that links it to the falsifier character? We see the question of the forger in Robbe-Grillet’s great film, The Man Who Lies (L’homme qui ment.) And for Welles, the problem of the image is a matter of the question of whether the cinematographic image can constitute a search for time. But an even greater problem for Welles is the problem of the power of the false. Most notable in this regard is Welles’ last film, F for Fake, and we note that it was not entitled “T for Time”. But “fake” is not simply “false.” “Fake” is rather all the operations of the falsifier with regard to filmmaking, as for example the make-up and special effects. And note that in this film, these operations of the falsifier involve not just one falsifier but rather a whole chain of them, as if any one falsifier by necessity requires many others. We also see the falsifier and time-image in Resnais’ Stavisky. This combined focus on the falsifier and the time-image in these director’s works is bound up with how the cinematographic image is now occupied by time rather than movement. All this then constitutes our fourth direction of investigation.]

C’est quand même curieux cette présence, oui je disais, il y a une œuvre qui n’est pas une œuvre sans doute qu’il ne doit pas trouver lui comme une œuvre fondamentale, il y a une œuvre de Godard, qui est un sketch dans une série de sketchs, série de sketchs qui s’appelle “Les plus belles escroqueries du monde” et un sketch de Godard, le sketch de Godard s’appelle “Le grand escroc”, c’est une structure assez complexe et lui-même ne le cache pas, il ne reproduit pas, il s’inspire d’un épisode de Melville, de Hermann Melville, c’est-à-dire il a emprunté au livre traduit sous le titre “Le grand escroc”, un passage qu’il réalise merveilleusement qu’il transforme beaucoup d’ailleurs, mais garde des choses très très précises et pour nous la peut être finalement surtout que le “Grand escroc” bon ben, ça semble être en dernière instance mais si y a une dernière instance, ça semble être Godard lui-même en tant qu’il fait du cinéma est coiffé d’une chéchia. Je dis que ça c’est encore anecdotique parce que j’suis pas sur que ce soit... Mais qu’est ce qui se passe ? je prends trois auteurs très, enfin connus Wells, Reisnais et mettons plus accessoirement je dirai pourquoi, il ne comporte aucun jugement péjoratif, Robbe-Grillet. Le thème du faussaire, si c’était un thème simplement du contenu de l’image ce serait pas très intéressant. (Quelqu’un passe et cri égoïste) C’est pas la peine de répéter ça tout le temps, qu’il essaye d’entrer que je lui explique comme ça ce sera fini, d’ailleurs je sais pas à qui il le dit ça “égoïste”. Agitation dans la salle. Est-ce que c’est à celui qui bloque la porte, est-ce que c’est à moi, est-ce que c’est à nous tous, c’est un singulier ou un pluriel égoïste hein d’abord ? C’est un singulier ? C’est de l’Italien ou de l’Espagnol ? C’est de l’espagnol, et c’est féminin ? C’est féminin alors c’est toi, pas moi. Si il dit ça tout le temps, je vais tout perdre mes idées, alors là je serai plus egoistin je serai amnésiquin.

C’est curieux, parce que qu’est ce qu’il y a de bizarre dans ces trois cas que je prends, on aura à voir ça, Wells, Reisnais, Robbe-Grillet ? C’est sûrement parmi les auteurs de cinéma, les trois qui ont fait le plus directement une recherche cinématographique sur le temps c’est-à-dire c’est trois créateurs d’images-temps. Je crois que ces trois, trois cas où réellement se fait le renversement du rapport temps/image pas théoriquement, où se fait le renversement du rapport mouvement /temps c’est-à-dire où le mouvement ou bien ce qui reste du mouvement devient subordonné au temps et pas l’inverse, en d’autres termes ce sont trois constructeurs d’images-temps. Est-ce que c’est par hasard que ces trois constructeurs d’images-temps, là ça devient important pour nous, soient en même temps les trois auteurs qui ont le plus lancé matériellement et formellement le thème du faussaire ? Là y a un lien qu’on peut pas encore comprendre et qui confirme mon titre :

→ Vérité et temps : le faussaire”.

Quelle est cette nature du temps tel que, il y a un rapport fondamental avec le personnage du faussaire ? et est ce un personnage même le faussaire ? Car enfin j’ai pas besoin de citer toute l’œuvre de Robbe-Grillet et recommencer par ce qu’on convient généralement de trouver comme son meilleur film “l’homme qui ment” Mais Wells, dont on aura à s’occuper dans le cadre de ce travail cette année, Wells dont il est pas difficile de montrer je crois que, le problème de l’image pour lui, consiste à poser la question et à y répondre, savoir si l’image cinématographique peut véritablement fouiller le temps ? Peut véritablement exprimer comme une image-temps ? Si c’est ça son plus haut problème, il y a encore un problème plus haut pour lui, qui est, le problème d’une puissance du faux. Et le dernier film de Wells ne s’appelle pas T comme temps, mais F comme Fake, or fake c’est pas simplement le faux, fake c’est le trucage, le maquillage, c’est-à-dire les opérations du faussaire. C’est pas le faux, c’est l’opération du faussaire et tout le film est constitué – tiens ça devrait nous intéresser, nous confirmer – par l’exposé d’une chaîne de faussaires, comme s’il ne pouvait pas y avoir qu’un seul faussaire et qu’un faussaire en exigeait d’autres. Et je dirai que la réflexion de Wells sur le temps emprunte la forme humoristique d’une réflexion sur le faussaire. Comment est ce possible et pourquoi ? Reisnais qui est sans doute celui qui, il me semble, qui après Wells a poussé le plus et le plus loin l’image cinématographique dans le sens d’une image-temps, on ne peut pas le séparer par exemple, d’un film qui pourtant n’a pas eu, je crois, un très grand succès, pourquoi et ce qu’il a éprouvé le besoin de faire un film sur Stavinsky, faussaire célèbre ? Pourquoi est ce que Wells est tourmenté, obsédé par l’idée du faussaire, qu’est ce qu’un faussaire, en quoi suis-je un faussaire, en quoi est ce que je ne suis pas un faussaire ? Pourquoi est ce que Robbe-Grillet est obsédé par L’homme qui ment ? Tout ça en rapport avec cette conversion qui fait que ce n’est plus le mouvement qui occupe l’image c’est le temps. Voila donc une autre direction de recherche.

(Voix 20.15-28.48)

[contents]

 

 

 

 

1983.11.08.1.8

[Investigation 5: Crystallography]

 

28.50-30.17

“Enfin, encore une autre direction de recherche, ... l’une donne une matière libre à l’autre. ”

 

[The fifth direction of investigation is the scientific study of crystallography. We will approach this scientific literature with the aim of finding resonances between our philosophical conceptualizations with these scientific ones, such that through this encounter both fields can benefit by means of a mutual contribution, even though neither one will operate appropriatively toward the other.]

 

[The fifth direction of investigation is crystallography. It is not immediately obvious how this theme is linked to the others, but Deleuze senses there is a fundamental relation between them. This study will be scientific. Our aim however will not be to fashion philosophical concepts that reflect upon the scientific concepts of crystallography but rather to see if we cannot find a communication between these domains whereby each one  somehow makes a material contribution to the other.]

→ Enfin, encore une autre direction de recherche, c’est vous dire à quel point elles sont séparées – et à première vue ça n’a rien a voir, ce sera à nous d’essayer de faire des liens, pour moi c’est fondamentalement lié. Je voudrais que certains d’entre vous surtout s’ils ont eu une formation un peu scientifique, s’occupent de cristallographie – là la bibliographie elle n’est pas difficile, vous prenez n’importe quel manuel de cristallographie, vous lisez avec un problème de récréation dans la tête. Est il possible et comment, est il possible de s’inspirer de notions scientifiques pour constituer des concepts philosophiques ? Evidemment il faut beaucoup de prudence dans une telle opération. Il s’agit pas de constituer des concepts philosophiques qui réfléchiraient sur la cristallographie, il s’agit de voir s’il n’y a pas de communication possible entre des disciplines telles que, l’une donne une matière libre à l’autre.

(Voix 28.50-30.17)

[contents]

 

 

 

 

 

1983.11.08.1.9

[Investigation 6: Description and Narration. (Bertrand Russell’s Notion of Description. Robbe-Grillet’s Notion of the New Novel. Narration as an Image-Component in Mankiewicz, Rohmer, and Pasolini.)]

 

30.20-42.15

“Dernière direction de recherche, lorsqu’il s’agit du faux, ... Là où j’y viens en les numérotant. ”

 

[The sixth direction of investigation is the relation between the logical notion of description (as with Bertrand Russell’s account of description) with the film critical notion of narration (as with Robbe-Grillet’s notion of narration in his concept of the New Novel). We find narration being an actual component of the sonic and visual image especially in Mankiewicz, Rohmer, and Pasolini.]

 

[The final direction of investigation is the question, what do the false and its power affect? This question takes us in a logical direction, as we will examine two notions that have a logical history. {1} The notion of description. We ask, what is a description, and what is it that we may call a description? {2} The notion of narration. We ask, what is it that qualifies as a narration? These two concepts are related (it seems), because in Robbe-Grillet’s notion of the New Novel, we find a conception of description. The New Novel claims not simply to renew description but also narration itself. This corresponds to a problem in modern logic that forced logicians to distinguish description from propositions. We find the logical treatment of description especially in Bertrand Russell’s Principles of Mathematics, but we can find his theory in his many other texts and in various books of modern logic. Under this investigative direction, we will need to ask: what is a description and what is a narration from the point of view of the cinematographic image? Deleuze notes that although many filmmakers use narration, not many have made narration a factor or independent variable in their films or treated narration as an actual component of the sonic and visual image. Mankiewicz, Rohmer, and Pasolini are the directors who did the most to make the dimension of narration be an autonomous factor or element in the sonic and visual image. We see this in Rohmer and Pasolini, because they place many of their films into series of tales. In Mankiewicz, we see narration becoming an autonomous factor in his utilization of flashbacks, (which serve as signposts to infinite temporal processes buried deep within time and that by certain means cinema can open up for view.) Deleuze then notes that we have covered six directions of investigation, and he invites his students to choose one or another of their own. A student then asks for clarification on the Dupréel text. After Deleuze gives more information about it, he emphasizes that we will examine the relation between these six directions of investigation; and, students should ask themselves if the themes of this class suit their interests.]

→ Dernière direction de recherche, lorsqu’il s’agit du faux, de la puissance du faux, qu’est ce qu’elle affecte ? Je crois que nous seront amenés à rencontrer deux notions qui ont toute une histoire logique, cette fois ci, ce serait une direction de recherche logique. Les notions, d’une part

→ la notion de description, qu’est ce qu’une description ? et qu’est ce qu’on peut appeler une description ?

→ Et la notion de narration, qu’est ce qu’on peut appeler une narration ? Ces deux thèmes – il y a une abondante bibliographie parce qu’ils sont relativement à la mode – je veux dire à partir du nouveau roman, s’est fait, un type de réflexion très poussé sur la description et de nouvelles fonctions possibles de la description. Chez Robbe-Grillet lui-même vous trouvez toute une conception de la description. Et ensuite le nouveau roman a prétendu non seulement renouveler la nature de la description, mais non pas du tout se passer de la narration, c’est-à-dire d’une histoire racontée, mais renouveler la narration. Seulement par là il rejoignait, je crois, un courant très important dans la logique, dans la logique moderne. Je veux pas dire qu’il s’en inspirait mais pourquoi que nous on ferait pas la jointure si l’on arrive à montrer que à l’origine de la logique peut être que là aussi il y avait un problème qui n’était pas celui qui se retrouvera chez les romanciers futurs, mais que à l’origine de la logique moderne il y avait un problème qui forçait les logiciens à distinguer les description et les propositions. Et que la logique des descriptions et des propositions je crois bien fait son entrée dans la logique, son entrée explicite, elle a bien sûr des précédents. Une fois de plus, avec un des plus grands logiciens qui soit, à savoir, Bertrand Russel. Pour ceux qui lisent l’anglais et là ça fait partie des [...] pas encore traduit, vous trouverez la théorie des descriptions de Russel dans un livre intitulé “Principe des mathématiques”. Mais tout livre sur Russel fait allusion à la théorie des descriptions chez, tout manuel de logique moderne parle de la théorie des description chez les logiciens modernes. Ceux donc qui ont le moindre sens ou la moindre compétence, la moindre habitude dans la logique actuelle, moi ça me servirait beaucoup et je serais très content qu’ils se lancent dans cette direction de recherche sur description et narration. Non seulement de point de vue de la critique littéraire ou la critique cinématographique, pourquoi je dis critique cinématographique ? Il faudra aussi se demander qu’est ce que s’est qu’une description et qu’est ce que c’est qu’une narration du point de vue de l’image cinématographique.

Apres tout, tous les cinéastes, tous les auteurs de cinéma, font des narrations, mais il y en a un petit nombre qui ont fait de la narration un facteur, comment dire, une variable indépendante et qui ont traité la narration comme une composante de l’image. C’est-à-dire qui ont vraiment posé au niveau du cinéma, un problème de la narration dans l’image, dans l’image sonore comme dans l’image visuelle. Moi je dirai les trois plus grands à mon avis hein, tout ça c’est comme ça, les trois plus grands qui ont vraiment saisi, qui ont fait de la dimension de la narration un facteur autonome, un élément autonome de l’image visuelle et sonore. Au cinéma c’est Mankiewicz, Rohmer et Pasolini. Ce qui le montre facilement pour Rohmer et Pasolini c’est que l’un comme l’autre présentent un certain nombre de leurs films comme des contes. Chez Mankiewicz ce qui le montre évidemment c’est que la plus part de ses films passent par le procédé du flash back. Le procédé du flash back n’a aucun intérêt, c’est un procédé purement formel dénué de tout intérêt [...] il ne définit rien et c’est évidemment pas lui qui définit la narration, en revanche il est bien comme un poteau indicateur, indiquant des procédés infiniment plus profonds ou cachant des procédés infiniment plus profonds qu’il faudra appeler : procédés narratifs propres au cinéma. Pourrait être intéressant à cet égard car si je dis Mankiewicz, Pasolini, Rohmer mais vous m’aidez d’avance si vous en ajoutez d’autres – je définirai simplement, je demanderai simplement si vous êtes d’accord sur ce critère – il faut que chez eux la narration soie devenue un élément autonome de l’image comme telle, de l’image visuelle et sonore. Ces trois là plus d’autres éventuels ça ferait une bonne direction de recherche – de chercher parce que c’est évidemment un des procédés chez les trois en tous cas, déjà s’en tenir à ces trois là, les procédés narratifs sont complètements différents. Voila ça fait trois, six directions de recherches, c’est énorme, alors vous choisissez celle que vous voulez, vous avez même le droit de n’en choisir aucune, c’est-à-dire d’en choisir d’autres, mais moi ça m’arrangerait que vous en choisissiez.

Alors du coup grâce à cette distribution de travail (bruit dans la salle), qu’est ce qui ne va pas ? Quelque chose qui ne va pas ? Hein non ?

Une élève pose une question.

Dupréel Eugène, Les sophistes, où ça a pu paraître ça alors, chez Vrin ou aux Presses universitaires de France sûrement, ou alors non c’est possible si ça a apparut en Belgique c’est encore si ça a apparut en Belgique c’est à Bruxelles publié à Bruxelles. Et que dire d’autre à mon avis c’est épuisé, c’est épuisé, ben non faut pas rire les bibliothèques ça existe on a tout le temps affaire avec des livres épuisés, qu’est ce que vous voulez faire ? Mais c’est un beau livre c’est curieux Dupréel c’est un type qui avait énormément, c’est un des types qui avaient le plus d’idées bizarres, comme il était Belge personne ne le prenait au sérieux, et c’est un, je crois que c’était un très grand philosophe, il a fait des choses extraordinaires, il lançait des, il lançait plein de notions, il avait inventé la notion d’intercale, il a des notions, l’intervalle, l’intercale, il disait « mais y a que des intervalles dans la vie, y a que ça », c’était vrai c’était très très, c’est d’une richesse, on se dit c’est, on a l’impression que c’est très curieux, ouais...et puis il a disparu complètement je sais même pas si les belges le lisent encore. Un élève : « si » Si ? Ah bon, ah bon, ah bon. Il y en a parmi vous qui ont lu du Dupréel ? Un élève : « étrangement c’est plus en sociologie qu’en philosophie »

[...] il faisait une espèce de conventionnalisme, et oui parce qu’il se disait lui-même sophiste, il était l’héritier des sophistes, oui. Bon, alors vous voyez notre tâche elle est toute simple, c’est faire une espèce d’introduction, le mieux c’est si cette introduction – mais sans forcer les choses sans vous paraître arbitraire du tout – mais comme dans un cour d’eau tout naturel entraînait tous ces thèmes. C’est-à-dire nous découvrait le rapport entre ces thèmes, qu’est ce que la cristallographie a affaire la dedans, la puissance du faux, le temps, qu’est ce que ça veut dire tout ça !

Si bien que dans cette introduction j’ai pas d’autre but, si bien qu’en fait on ne pourra commencer le travail que après cette introduction, et cette introduction faut pas que m’en demandiez trop, faut pas me demander de me justifier puisque justifier ce que j’ai à dire, il faut juste demander que vous le sentiez. Alors c’est toujours mon critère si vous le sentez pas à l’issue de l’introduction, si vous le sentez pas vous vous en allez et vous revenez pas, je veux dire vous vous en allez et vous revenez pas ça veut dire que ce que je ferai cette année vous convient pas. Si vous sentez quelque chose, ben vous restez. Mais je prétends pas justifier ce que je vais dire, je prétends établir des liens des rapports, poser des problèmes comme ça. Là où j’y viens en les numérotant,

(Voix 30.20-42.15)

[contents]

 

 

 

 

 

1983.11.08.1.10

[The True as the Distinction between Real and Imaginary; and between Essence and Appearance. The False as their Confusion. Error as this Confusion.]

 

42.15-45.28

“je dis premièrement, vous comprenez, je reprends mon titre, ... si il tape comme ça [...]. ”

 

[We turn now to the notion of the true (le vrai) rather than truth (vérité). The true is not the real in contradistinction to the imaginary as the false. Nor is the true the essence in contradistinction to the appearance as the false. Rather, the true is the distinction between the real and the imaginary and between the essence and the appearance, while the false is the confusion between the imaginary and the real and between the appearance and the essence. What we call “error” is this confusion.]

 

[Deleuze returns to his title and suggests that instead of Truth and Time: The Falsifier we consider The True and Time: The Falsifier. (“Vérité et temps : le faussaire” vs. “Le vrai et temps.” I am guessing at the translations of vérité and le vrai. Please suggest something more correct if you would.) We first note that the true is not the same as the real. For, roughly speaking, the true is the distinction between the real and the imaginary. Also, the true is not the same as essence, because similarly it is the distinction between essence and appearance. We find a similar conception for the false. The false is not the imaginary, nor is it the appearance. Rather, the false is the confusion of the imaginary with the real, or the confusion of the appearance with the essence. And what we call “error” is simply this confusion. (There is another disturbance at the door.)]

→ je dis premièrement, vous comprenez, je reprends mon titre, vrai et temps le vrai et temps, non vérité et temps le faussaire. Je dis et bien, au moins qu’est ce que c’est que le vrai ? Faut pas, et ben avant de commencer quand même hein j’ai du souci malgré les apparences, il y a pas moyen, je vois que vous êtes très très serrés là, y a pas moyen, y a des places ici là [...] ceux qui, il y a pas moyen que on se sert par là.... C’est un bon sujet, mais tout ce qu’on peut dire c’est que en tous cas le vrai c’est pas la même chose que le réel. Et pourquoi le vrai c’est pas la même chose que le réel ? Parce que on peut parler très vaguement, le vrai c’est la distinction du réel et de l’imaginaire, on dirait aussi bien peu importe pour le moment, c’est la distinction de l’essence et de l’apparence, le vrai c’est pas l’essence, c’est la distinction de l’essence et de l’apparence, c’est la distinction du réel et de l’imaginaire.

→ Bon on va pas aller trop loin hein, et de même le faux c’est quoi ? Le faux c’est pas l’imaginaire, c’est pas l’apparent, le faux c’est la confusion de l’imaginaire avec le réel, de l’apparent avec l’essence, et l’on appelle erreur, l’acte qui consiste à faire cette confusion. Vous me direz bon ben, ça va pas loin, ça va si peu loin qu’on arrête, on arrête et on recommence, d’accord, mais, mais alors, la distinction..

(quelqu’un frappe à la porte), faut dire il y a personne, c’est fini, (de nouveau quelqu’un frappe) si il tape comme ça [...].

(Voix 42.15-45.28)

[contents]

 

 

 

 

 

1983.11.08.1.11

[The Distinction between the Real and the Imaginary as Operating in the Image by Means of their Corresponding Distinction between the Representative and Modificatory Functional Poles of the Image]

 

45.30-49.56

“Vous comprenez la distinction du réel et de l’imaginaire, ... c’est les deux pôles représentatifs, modificatifs, voilà.”

 

[The real and the imaginary in the image are not like two image-components. However, what are in fact parts of the image are two functional poles: the representative aspect and the soul-body modificatory aspect. We see both entangled in a sensation, for example. A sensation is an image because it can both represent something (for example, its cause) and it modifies our body and soul. Nonetheless, the distinction between the real and the imaginary still operates in the image, even if neither the real nor the imaginary itself are to be found in the image. For, the distinction between the real and the imaginary operates as the differential relation between the representative and modificatory functions of the image, respectively.]

 

 

[This distinction between the real and the imaginary, and the essence and the appearance, must be produced in the image. And, since we have no way out of the image, it is also in the image that the confusion between these pairings occurs. Now, what corresponds to the real in the image is the power of representing something. These are ideas that we can find in 17th century philosophy. What corresponds to the real in the image is its representative value, that is, its possibility of representing something. And what corresponds to the imaginary in the image is the image insofar as it expresses a modification of our body or our soul. (From Descartes to Malebranche we find these two poles in their stark distinction, namely, that which represents something and that which expresses a modification. I may get this next idea wrong, so consult the quotation below; but it might be the following. A sensation is a composite of both representation and modification. A sensation is an image because in it something can be represented. At the same time, a sensation envelops a modification, and it is in this sense that we would say that the true is not thereby given by a modification-image. Also in the image is its ideative aspect, which is what refers to the representation of something, and we call it the idea. It is the task of truth to make the distinction between the ideative and modificatory aspects of the image, which ultimately is to distinguish the real from the imaginary. But that does not mean the image really possess a distinct part of it that can be said to be real and another that can be said to be imaginary. Rather, the distinction between the real and the imaginary operate in the image. To that distinction in the image between its representative and modificatory functions there corresponds the distinction between the real and the imaginary, respectively. I probably have this wrong, so see the quotation below.)]

Vous comprenez la distinction du réel et de l’imaginaire, de l’essence et de l’apparence, c’est dans l’image qu’elle doit se produire, en effet on a pas de moyen de sortir de l’image, donc c’est dans l’image que se produit la distinction aussi bien que la confusion. Ah oui mais si y a une distinction ou une confusion, du réel et de l’imaginaire c’est dans l’image qu’elle doit se faire. Bon mais si c’est dans l’image que se produisent et la distinction et la confusion du réel et de l’imaginaire, de l’essence et de l’apparence, {apparent break in tape (fade-out and fade-in)} mais l’un qui correspond au réel et l’autre qui corresponde à l’imaginaire, qu’est ce que c’est ces deux aspects de l’image ? Je dirai que ce qui correspond au réel dans l’image, c’est son pouvoir de représenter quelque chose, Du coup à mesure que j’avance vous vient une idée immédiate si vous avez fait une petit peu de philosophie, il est en train de nous raconter tant bien que mal, ce qui domine la philosophie dite classique telle qu’elle apparaît au 17eme siècle. Ce qui correspond au réel dans l’image c’est sa valeur représentative, sa possibilité de représenter quelque chose. Ce qui correspond à l’imaginaire dans l’image c’est quoi ? l’imaginaire c’est pas la même chose que l’image, il a quelque chose dans l’image qui correspond à l’imaginaire oui, qu’est ce que c’est ? C’est plus l’image en tant qu’elle peut représenter quelque chose, c’est l’image en tant ou en tant qu’elle représente quelque chose, c’est l’image en tant qu’elle exprime une modification de mon corps ou de mon âme. Et par exemple, vous trouvez dans tout le 17eme siècle l’affirmation de ces deux pôles de Descartes à Malebranche la distinction explicite de ces deux pôles, ce qui représente quelque chose, ce qui exprime une modification, par exemple une sensation c’est compliqué : en quel sens une sensation est elle une image ? Une sensation est une image parce que peut être qu’en elle quelque chose représente. Mais aussi elle enveloppe une modification, c’est en ce sens que le vrai n’est pas donné. Débrouillé dans l’image, ce qui renvoie à la représentation de quelque chose et qu’on appellera dès lors l’idée, peu importe hein, ça sera l’aspect idéatif. Et ce qui ne fait qu’exprimer une modification de mon âme ou de mon corps, c’est la tâche de la vérité en tant que distinction, mais voyez distinction opérant dans l’image entre le réel et l’imaginaire. La distinction entre le réel et l’imaginaire, s’opère dans l’image bien que ni le réel ni l’imaginaire ne fassent partie de l’image. Ce qui fait partie de l’image c’est les deux pôles représentatifs, modificatifs, voilà.

(Voix 45.30-49.56, curly bracketed insertion is mine)

[contents]

 

 

 

 

 

1983.11.08.1.12

[The True as Having a Form and the False as Lacking One. The Truthful Person as Maintaining the Distinction between the Real (the Representative) and the Imaginary (the Body/Soul Modificatory) Aspects of the Image. The Mistaken Person as Giving the False the Form of the True.]

 

50.00-54.08

“L’erreur, c’est l’acte par lequel je confonds ... mais il y a que le vrai qui ait une forme, pourquoi ? ”

 

[The truthful person distinguishes the real (representative) from the imaginary (modificatory) aspects of the image. As such, a truthful person would not take their desire to represent anything, because desires are simply modifications. The mistaken person however would mistake their desires for reality. We can distinguish the true and the false in the following way: only the true has a form, and thus there is no form of the false. The mistaken person, however, does not confuse the form of the false with the form of the true (for the false has no form to begin with); rather, the mistaken person gives to the false the form of the true.]

 

[Deleuze reminds us that error is the act by which we confuse the two aspects of the image, while the true is the act by which we distinguish these two aspects. The truthful person is the one who distinguishes these two aspects of the image, meaning that they do not confuse a modification of their soul or body with a representation of something. We consider the example of desire. A desire is something that you have, and it is a modification of your body and soul. But a desire does not represent anything. (However, you can confuse a modification of desire with a representation, and in that way you mistake your desires for realities. This is the operation of the false of the person who is mistaken. But it is not easy to distinguish the modifications and the representations in the image. So we wonder, how do we make this distinction? 17th century philosophy often reminds us of the following formula that seems obscure but in fact is illuminative: “only the true has a form.” Similarly from 17th century philosophy we find the great axiom of their theory of knowledge: “the false has no form.” Thus there is only a form of the true. (A student then asks if ignorance is the false. Deleuze says no, and gives some explanation, then comes back to his point.) So again, only the true has a form (or: there is only a form of the true), and there is no form of the false. This means that the person who is mistaken does not confuse the form of the false with the form of the true (for the false has no form to begin with); rather, the mistaken person is the one who gives the false the form of the true.]

→ L’erreur, c’est l’acte par lequel je confonds les deux aspects de l’image,

→ le vrai c’est l’acte par lequel je distingue les deux aspects de l’image. L’homme véridique, qu’est ce que l’homme véridique ?

→ l’homme véridique est celui qui distingue les deux aspects de l’image, c’est-à-dire qui qui ne confond pas la modification de son âme et de son corps avec la représentation de quelque chose. [...] prenez un désir par exemple, vous avez un désir, et ben un désir c’est une modification, c’est une modification de votre corps et de votre âme, ça ne représente rien. Qu’est ce que ça veut dire prendre vos désirs pour des réalités, prendre vos désirs pour des réalités qui est l’opération du faux de l’homme qui se trompe, et bien prendre vos désirs pour des réalités, c’est confondre une modification avec une représentation. Ceci dit c’est pas facile de distinguer dans l’image les modifications et les représentations. Vous voyez c’est tout simple.

Alors comment est ce qu’on peut les distinguer ? Le 17eme siècle ne cesse pas de nous rappeler une formule qui parait obscure mais qui en fait est lumineuse : « seul le vrai a une forme. » Ca c’est une formule que vous trouvez alors partout, vous la trouvez partout, de tous temps, de tous temps dans tout le moyen age, mais dans les textes qui nous sont plus facilement accessibles, elle, elle est non seulement conservée mais portée à un niveau même particulièrement de principe fondamental, de grand axiome, le grand axiome de la théorie de la connaissance au 17eme siècle c’est « le faux n’a pas de forme ». Il n’y a de forme que du vrai.

→ Un élève : est ce que l’ignorance c’est du faux ?

→ GD : Quoi ?

→ L’élève : est ce que l’ignorance c’est du faux ?

→ GD : Non, je viens de dire, le faux c’est la confusion de l’imaginaire avec le réel, l’ignorance c’est-à-dire le non savoir, le faux des lors s’incarne dans l’erreur, l’ignorance c’est, l’ignorance, si il y a une ignorance absolue, si l’on prend, si l’on imagine une ignorance pure, ben elle risque pas de confondre quoi que ce soit, il y a ni réel ni imaginaire, il y a pas de faux non, non, on peut pas dire que l’ignorant soit dans le faux, on dirait simplement et – Platon le dirait il est dans le non être – il ne compte pas le non être pour de l’être, ce qui est le cas de l’erreur, l’ignorance non, simplement il n’y a pas d’ignorance, il n’ y a jamais d’ignorance, c’est un état limite quoi, il n’y a jamais d’ignorance, pour les philosophes classiques il y a des gens qui se trompent, c’est-à-dire des ignorances partielles, il n’y a pas d’ignorance totale, il n’ y a jamais d’ignorance totale. Alors bon, seul le vrai a une forme, que savez vous de ça, il n’y a pas de forme du faux, cette pensée c’est la plus simple du monde, évidemment on peut pas leur donner tort pour ça, comment donner tort a des philosophes aussi grands ? il n’y a de forme que du vrai.

Si bien que celui qui se trompe c’est pas du tout quelqu’un qui confondrait dans les deux formes, la forme du faux et la forme du vrai, c’est quelqu’un qui donne au faux la forme du vrai, c’est quelqu’un qui donne à ce qui n’est pas vrai, la forme du vrai, mais il y a que le vrai qui ait une forme, pourquoi ?

(Voix 50.00-54.08)

[contents]

 

 

 

 

 

1983.11.08.1.13

[Form as Universality and Necessity, Endowed by Means of Affirmational Judgments. The True and the False in Terms of Formal Universality and Necessity.]

 

54.08-1.00.49

“Si l’on comprend ce que veut dire “forme”, ... les jugements que je porte sur lui sont privés de toute universalité et nécessité de droit.”

 

[Form is that which is universal and necessary with regard to something’s conception. The universality and necessity of a particular form are not so in actual fact (de fait) but only in principle (de droit). This is because the universality and necessity of a particular form are endowed as qualifiers of that form only by means of the affirmations operating in our judgments made about that form, with such judgments being involved in any conception of that thing. For example, when conceiving of the form of the human, we might make the judgment, “the human is a rational animal”. What is formal about the human is its rationality and animality, which by means of this judgment we affirm to be universal and necessary (and thus formal). In other words, when we conceive of the human being, it is impossible to deny its rationality and animality, because these are some of its universal and necessary features.  This universality and necessity are only so in principle and not in actual fact, in two senses: {1} it holds only for humans and not universally and necessarily for all forms whatsoever, and thus it is not universal and necessary in actual fact, and {2} the formal features actually hold only under the conditions and operations of the judgments made while conceiving the form. So a triangle has three angles necessarily and universally, but that necessity and universality come to affectively qualify the triangle only when we affirm this as a formal property of triangles by means of the judgments involved in our conceptualization of triangles. In other words, just because the form of a triangle in principle includes universally and necessarily that it has three angles does not mean that in actual fact every person is always thinking about triangles and their number of sides. That affirmation of universal and necessary features is something that comes into play only when it is conceived, even though these features are always there in principle. As we said above, only the true has a form, and so the false lacks form. Now that we have defined form as the universality and necessity that is affirmed of something by means of a judgment formed in its conceptualization, we can further distinguish the true from the false in the following way: the true is that which is affirmed in a judgment made while conceptualizing something, with those affirmed features being universal and necessary formally in principle, and the false is that which is affirmed in some such judgment, with those affirmed features not being universal and necessary formally in principle. For example, the true in “the human is a rational animal” would be the rationality and animality being undeniable in every conception of the human, while the false in “the human is a moral animal” would be the morality being deniable in some conceptions – or maybe even in all conceptions – of the human being.]

 

[We try now to conceptualize what we mean by “form”. Since Aristotle, form has taken a very clear sense, namely, it is the universal and the necessary. This definition holds from Aristotle to Kant without changing. But for form to be the universal and the necessary does not imply that there is but one form. For, we can distinguish the form of a triangle from that of a circle. Rather, we say that the form is the universal and the necessary because whatever we say of a form can only be said under the species of the universal and the necessary. (I probably have the next ideas wrong, so please consult the quotation below. This is not a matter of a universality or a necessity in actual fact. But we might consider thinking of it a little that way by understanding the imaginary as the variation of form, thereby giving a little truth and a little error ((in that the variation gives a little of the original form and a little of what it is not)), all while the true true is what remains always and everywhere universal and necessary. But a triangle’s being everywhere and always universal and necessary does not mean that it is always being conceived in everyone’s mind; for, many people do not think about the triangle and yet live quite well regardless. However, this is the important point: if you think about the triangle, your conception will always involve certain universal and necessary features. That is to say, if you think of the triangle, there will be certain features of your conceptualization that you cannot deny. For example, suppose you think about a triangle. You thereby will be unable to deny it is composed of three angles joined by three straight lines. And if you think of the three angles of the triangle, you cannot deny that the total angular measure of these three angles totals that of two right angles. So this is a universality and necessity in thought, which in philosophy we would characterize by saying, “a universality is in principle a necessity.”) (I probably have not summarized this in the best way, and surely I do not have a complete understanding. Let me comment on what seems to be some ideas here. Form is the universal and necessary. Form however is not universal and necessary in actual fact ((de fait)). Were form universal in actual fact, then all things would have the same form. This we know is not so. And maybe, were form necessary in actual fact, then whatever form something has, it cannot be otherwise. This we also know is not so. Rather, what makes form universal and necessary is that insofar as it is given to any conception whatsoever, regardless of the instance and circumstances of that conception, the conception will involve the same formal features ((so always the thought of the triangle will involve the conceptual features of three angles etc.)), which is its universality. And, it will be impossible in each conception to conceive the form as having different features ((so the form of the triangle will never involve the conceptual feature of curvilinear lines, at least under Euclidian assumptions.)) This is its necessity. So the form of the triangle is not universal and necessary in actual fact, because its universality and necessity only present themselves under particular acts or structures of conception. However, it is universal and necessary in principle ((de doit)), because even while a form is not being conceived, it retains certain properties such that were it to be conceived, it would exhibit its universal and necessary features.) This means that something is a form insofar as it is affected in principle by a universality and a necessity, which happens in the following way. In order to conceive some form, we must make certain judgments about it, for otherwise it would lack its particular conceptual features. So by means of these judgments, we affirm things about the form, and these things that we affirm are universal and necessary. If we take the triangle example, when we conceive a triangle, we thereby also make particular judgments about it by which we affirm certain universal and necessary features, like its having three angles etc. In this way, the form is affected by the universalizing and necessitating affirmations of its features, because it confers these properties (universality and necessity) to them by means of this affirmational judgment, thereby making universality and necessity be qualifiers of the form. Deleuze gives the following example. When we conceive of “human,” we make the judgment “a human is a rational animal.” By means of this judgment, we have affirmed that rationality and animality belong to the human necessarily and universally. So again, it is by means of a conceptual operation, affirmation in judgment, that necessity and universality become qualities of the form. (Thus it is only in principle that the form is necessary and universal and not in fact. For, were it in fact, then the form would not need the affirmative operation to obtain its universal and necessary qualities. Rather, forms are universal and necessary in principle, because they would hold under any circumstance, but those circumstances are never guaranteed to happen in actual fact.) So again, the form of the true is the universal and the necessary, and this allows us to distinguish the true from the false. For, the false has no form, meaning that any judgments brought to bear on the false will lack universality and necessity in principle. (I am not sure how to illustrate this. Let us consider two cases. We make the judgement, “the human is a moral animal.” This holds not in all cases of humans. So it lacks universality and necessity. What is “the false” here? It would seem to be the lack of the form of universality and necessity, but I am not sure how to explicate that. Maybe the false here would be “the human’s being moral” being a conception with no formality in the sense that what it affirms does not “hold” rigidly. It may hold contingently, it may never hold, but it does not in the strict sense hold. It lacks holdity, if you will. That is the best way I have at the moment to connect truth with form under these conceptions.)]

Si l’on comprend ce que veut dire “forme”, et qu’est ce que veut dire forme ?

→ Forme a un sens très clair depuis Aristote, forme c’est : l’universel et le nécessaire.

→ Et de Aristote à Kant ça ne changera pas, la forme c’est l’universel et le nécessaire. Et qu’est ce que ça veut dire ça la forme c’est l’universel et le nécessaire ? Est-ce que ça veut dire il n y a qu’une forme ? Non, si je dis le triangle a ses deux angles égaux [..] c’est le triangle c’est pas le cercle, il y a donc plusieurs formes, alors pourquoi est ce que je dois dire quand même que la forme c’est l’universel et le nécessaire – c’est pas parce que la forme elle-même est universelle et nécessaire – c’est parce que, ce que je dis de la forme, je ne peux le dire que sous les espèces de l’universel et du nécessaire. Qu’est ça veut dire ?

Il ne s’agit pas d’une universalité de fait, parce que à ce moment là y aurait qu’une seule forme, il ne s’agit pas d’une nécessité de fait – pourtant on peut l’interpréter un peu comme ça, on peut dire : ah bah oui, l’imaginaire c’est lorsque ça varie, vérité ici et erreur là bas, tandis que le vrai vrai et bien c’est ce qui est partout et toujours, universel et nécessaire. Oui, mais en quel sens est ce que c’est partout et toujours ? beaucoup de gens ne pensent pas et vivent très bien sans penser au triangle. Voila ce qu’ils veulent nous dire ces philosophes, ils veulent nous dire une chose très simple, beaucoup de gens vivent très bien sans penser au triangle. Cela nous arrive même, et on pense pas toujours au triangle – donc dire la forme du triangle est universelle et nécessaire, c’est pas dire que on y pense toujours et nécessairement. Ils sont pas idiots ils savent très bien qu’on passe notre temps à ne pas penser au triangle. En revanche ils disent, si vous pensez au triangle, vous ne pouvez pas nier – voilà, voila leur grande formule – vous ne pouvez pas nier, si vous pensez au triangle vous ne pouvez pas nier une telle figure avec trois angles implique nécessairement trois droites se coupant. Bon, et si vous pensez aux trois angles du triangle, vous ne pouvez pas nier que ces trois angles soient égaux à deux droits. En d’autres termes c’est une universalité et une nécessité pensée ou ce qu’on appellera en philosophie “une universalité est une nécessité de droit”.

→ Une forme est une forme en tant qu’elle est affectée, non pas en tant qu’elle se confond avec les autres ou en tant qu’elle est présente partout et toujours, mais en tant qu’elle est affectée d’une universalité et d’une nécessité de droit, c’est-à-dire que les jugements que je porte sur elle sont eux, universels et nécessaires. Donc Universel et nécessaire comme qualificatifs de la forme ou du vrai concernent l’opération du jugement qui affirme quelque chose de la forme. Je peux dire l’homme est un animal raisonnable, voila la forme de l’homme, qu’il soit un animal raisonnable c’est universel et nécessaire, c’est-à-dire cela appartient nécessairement à l’homme et cela vaut pour tous les hommes – ça veut pas dire qu’il y ait partout des hommes. Voyez donc ce que veut dire universalité et nécessité de droit, par distinction avec universalité et nécessité de fait. Si vous avez compris ça vous pénétrez déjà dans la plus pure philosophie. Bon, je veux dire ils disent pas n’importe quoi, ils ont des systèmes de définitions [...] de démonstrations extrêmement rigoureux. Donc accordez moi tout ça, mais ça durera pas, c’est un moment à passer quoi.

→ Donc vous voyez que, ça veut dire que : d’accord la forme du vrai c’est l’universel et le nécessaire, dès lors j’ai un moyen de distinguer le vrai et le faux. Le faux n’a pas de forme, c’est-à-dire les jugements, par définition il n’a pas de forme, si vous avez compris ce que veut dire forme, le faux n’a pas de forme, c’est évident, et précisément parce qu’il n’a pas de forme, les jugements que je porte sur lui sont privés de toute universalité et nécessité de droit.

(Voix 00.54.08-01.00.49)

[contents]

 

 

 

 

1983.11.08.1.14

[The Extraction of the True and the Formal from the Image by Neglecting the Modificational. The Truthful Person as Allowing Their Soul to Be Only Veridically Informed by True Givens.]

 

1.00.57-1.05.04

“Dès lors qu’est ce que l’homme véridique ? ... l’empreinte du vrai sur mon âme ce sera, ce sera ça l’information.”

 

[The variations in the world of images that are somehow bound up with their respective forms can be understood either as {1} modifications (being accidental alterations to the universal and necessary features of the respective form), as {2} appearances (being impure and misleading presentations of the respective form), or as {3} the imaginary (having a status of not being the real form but rather some sensory presentation of one.) According to a classical philosophical perspective, the truth is never presented in its unadulterated form, standing out already from the modificatory aspects of the image. Rather, it must be extracted. To make that extraction, we must distinguish in the world of images two poles: {1} the representative pole, which renders to us the real and the essences, and {2} the modificatory pole, which makes us fall back into the imaginary and into the appearance. The truthful person is the one who only allows themselves to be modified by the form and thus by the true and sets aside the modifications to their mind and soul coming from the non-formal, sensory parts of the image. But for our soul to be modified by the formal and true means for it to be veridically informed by true givens.]

 

[We turn now to the topic of the truthful one. First we note that modifications are deprived of all necessity and universality, and these modifications are pure and simple modifications of images. For example, we can draw a triangle on the chalkboard in one particular way, or in another way, or using another chalk color. (These variations to the form of the triangle can be understood as {1} modifications (being alterations over and above the form which simply dictates the variations have the universal and necessary properties of the form or at least that they allude to them), as {2} appearances (being ways that the form can take on an appearance over and beyond the purity of its essence, being contaminated with non-essential features like the visual properties of the chalk-lines), or as {3} the imaginary (I am not sure why for this one. Perhaps we need to distinguish the variations with the “real” triangle, but I am still confused because we see the triangles on the board rather than see them in our imagination. I really have no idea. I wonder if we are talking about the variations on the form of the triangle, but any such variation veers from the real triangle and is an imaginary representation meaning that it presents an image in our mind that is not identical to its conceptual formalities but which points us to them by being approximations.) (Before moving on to the next ideas, let me review some ideas that might be helpful. But this will involve some guessing on my part still. We have just established that images present arbitrary modifications, contingent appearances, and inaccurate imaginational presentations of a form. But these images would seem to present to us both these irreal factors as well as the real ones. Consider the drawn triangles, and suppose one is red. Insofar as we recognize it as a triangle, we know it to express a certain form. But that expressed real form, being such as it is universal and necessary, is bound up with the contingent factors such as its color, size, material composition, etc. These contingent factors in the first place are modifications of the form itself. Now let us consider our experience of the drawn triangles. We gain sensory information, which modifies our body and soul. What do we sense? What are in the sense data? Is it the form of the triangle? It would seem that the form is not immediately given in the sense data. The colors, sizes, textures, etc. are given, but not the form itself. So these modifications to the form itself correspond also to sensory/imaginary modifications in our body and soul. However, despite these modifications that fail to directly present the form to our senses, we still discern that triangular form, for otherwise we would not call it a triangle upon seeing it. So we need to extract the formal real elements away from the imaginary modificatory elements. The truthful one is the person who both believes in the possibility of this extraction and as well is committed to making it in all cases. But we should be clear about terminology. The true has been defined in two ways, it seems. The true is that which has a form, and the false is what does not. Something is true if as a judgment it affirms something universal and necessary ((and thus formal)) about the thing, and something is false if as a general judgment it affirms something particular and accidental about the thing. The true thus corresponds to the form and the false to the modifications. However, prior to that definition, we defined the true as the distinction between the real and the imaginary. How do we rectify these two definitions? I will guess here. Whenever we affirm a true element in something, like the triangularity of the drawn triangles, we can only do so by means of finding its distinction to the thing’s modificatory false elements. In other words, the extraction of the form, which involves finding the distinction between the real and imaginary, is the same act as the affirmation of what is true about the thing. With all that in mind, I will now work through Deleuze’s words in their given order.) So as we can see, truth is never presented as ready-made and isolated. Rather, it needs to be extracted. Classical philosophers tell us that the truth must be extracted; truth is not just sitting there waiting for you and showing itself to you in its unadulterated form. So if you do not extract the true from the false, then, according to classical philosophy, you will find yourself lost in a world of images and in a state of anguish. Classical philosophy claims that in such a world of images where it is hard to recognize forms, philosophy provides us the tools to recognize them, namely, we are to sort the world of images according to two poles: {1} the representative pole, which renders to us the real and the essences, and {3} the modificatory pole, which makes us fall back into the imaginary and the appearance. To be sure, no one can completely escape from appearances, on account of our passions, which even philosophers must have. However, the classical philosophers think that nonetheless we should make this extraction as much as we possibly can. The truthful one is then defined in the following way: they are the sort who only allows themselves to be modified by the form, subordinating the modifications to their mind and soul to the form, which is the form of the true. And to be modified only by the form means to have our soul undergo a veridical informing of true givens. ]

→ Dès lors qu’est ce que l’homme véridique ? Privé de toute nécessité et universalité de droit qu’est ce que c’est ? Des modifications, ce sont de pures et simples modifications d’images. Tiens voila un triangle ! bon, je peux le dessiner comme ceci, je peux le dessiner comme cela, je peux le dessiner avec une craie rouge, avec une craie blanche, c’est des modifications ou si vous préférez ce sont des apparences, ou si vous préférez c’est de l’imaginaire.

→ Dès lors qu’est ce que l’homme véridique ? Car après tout la vérité c’est pas, je viens d’essayer de montrer que ça existait pas tout fait, faut la dégager. Les philosophes les plus classiques ont toujours dit : faut dégager la vérité, elle est pas là, elle vous attend pas, si vous la dégagez pas du faux, vous vous trouvez de toute manière dans un monde d’image. Alors vous reconnaissez un philosophe classique à ce que il vous dit : on est perdu dans un monde d’images, ça peut être même une grande angoisse, l’angoisse de ce monde d’images qui balaie tout. Le classicisme mais c’est des angoisses, c’est terrible, c’est des gens qui ont un rapport avec Dieu dans l’angoisse, le désespoir, bon etc., c’est pas des tranquilles hein, les classiques, les classiques c’est toujours des baroques et les baroques c’est toujours des classiques, alors. Mais qu’est ce qu’ils veulent dire ? Et ben ils veulent dire : vous reconnaissez un classique parce que dans ce monde d’images là où on ne se reconnaît pas, ils estiment que la philosophie nous donne un certain moyen de nous y reconnaître, à savoir, ben oui il faut que vous triez le monde, dans vos images : deux pôles,

→ le pole représentatif

→ le pole modification,

→ l’un vous donnera le réel

→ l’autre vous fera retomber dans l’imaginaire,

→ l’un vous livrera les essences

→ l’autre vous laissera retomber dans l’apparence, Bien sûr faut pas exagérer, vous pourrez jamais échapper complètement aux apparences, car vous avez des passions, même le philosophe. Mais mais, mais, mais, mais mais, autant que faire se peut, comme ils aiment à dire dans leur beau langage classique, autant qu’il est en nous, autant qu’il est possible, l’homme véridique ce sera quoi ?

→ Ce sera celui qui pour le mieux, ne se laissera modifier que par la forme, qui subordonnera les modifications de son âme et de son corps à la forme, laquelle est forme du vrai.

Et cet acte par lequel la forme modifie sera quoi ? Je pourrais dire que c’est une véritable information, l’information du vrai, l’information de mon âme par le vrai, l’empreinte du vrai sur mon âme ce sera, ce sera ça l’information.

(Voix 1.00.57-1.05.04)

[contents]

 

 

 

 

1983.11.08.1.15

[Organic Representation. The Eternality of Forms.]

 

1.05.12-1.09.26

“Et je peux dire que la double activité du vrai ...Voila c’est mon résumé. .”

 

[The true’s modification of our soul and our soul’s allowing only the true form to modify it is the organic activity of human beings, and the veridical representation of the form in the images we perceive and create is organic representation. This organic element is elaborated by Worringer. Because the true is the form which is itself the universal and necessary, we seem to have stripped time away from the true by making forms eternal, despite the paradoxes this engenders.]

 

[(Deleuze then speaks of the double activity of the true, but I am not sure what it is. My guess is that this informing process has two activities that are bound together: {1} the impressing activity of the true information, and {2} the soul’s selective allowing only of true information ((forms)) to modify it.) This double activity of the true that modifies our soul and in which our soul as much as possible only allows itself to be modified by the form, which is the true, constitutes the organic activity of humans and of the true. In fact, we might go so far as to say that the true is the form and more specifically it is the organic form. We will not dwell on this point, as we have attended a lot to this matter in prior years. For more on this notion of the organic representation, we can consult Worringer’s work on Gothic art where he explains how representation in classical art can be considered organic representation. With Worringer we find that the form of the true is fundamentally linked to organic representation which is this informing of the soul by the form. (I am not entirely sure I follow this point so well. I will need to work more on this, and I will come back if I figure it out. From looking through the Worringer text, my current guess is the following. The organic representation, as seen for example in an organic line of classic ornament, is distinguished from an abstract representation, as with the abstract lines of primitive art. The organic representation, unlike the abstract representation that presents forms independent of reference to real living forms in the natural world, involves a flowing forth of formation as if the natural world impresses itself upon us and we return that influence by means of an original, but still organically inspired, expression in natural sorts of forms. That is a huge guess. But I am not sure at the moment how else to work the organic in here.) (Deleuze then seems to say that this view that the form of the true is defined by the universal and necessary in principle, which is also an organic activity, takes the eternal as its model. I am not grasping all this so well, but if I may continue my guesswork, Deleuze might be saying the following. Whatever is universal and necessary in principle is so because regardless of where and when the form is conceived or expressed, it will always have its given undeniable features. In that sense, it is something timelessly eternal in the sense that it has no temporal determinations in the flow of duration. Then Deleuze might be saying next that when you remove time from truth, you encounter certain paradoxes that the Greeks had dealt with and that continued to reverberate even into the 17th and 18th centuries. If I had to guess, I would propose the paradox of future contingents as one possibility and maybe something like the debate over free will and determinism with the Master Argument. I am throwing out guesses. But in these cases, when we consider something as true, it is true at every time, past, present, and future. But then for example whatever happens in the future is true now, which seems paradoxical if in fact the future is not yet determined. Deleuze finally reviews a couple points. Under the classical conception, which takes the point of view of the organic form of the true, the true is a matter of distinguishing the real from the imaginary. The false is the confusion of the real and the imaginary; or, the essence and the appearance; or, the representation and the modification.]

Et je peux dire que la double activité du vrai qui modifie mon âme et mon âme qui pour autant que faire se peut, ne se laisse modifier que par la forme c’est-à-dire par le vrai, constitue l’activité organique de l’homme et du vrai.

Je dirai à la limite que donc le vrai c’est la forme et c’est la forme organique, je voudrais pas m’appesantir là-dessus je demande juste qu’on me – parce que je l’ai fait abondamment d’autres années, alors ça fait rien. Et c’est vrai en philosophie comme en art, je renvoie très rapidement et là je commente plus mais pour ceux qui étaient pas là et qui veulent se renseigner sur ce point, à un chapitre très beau du critique Allemand Woringer, dans l’art gothique où il explique comment la représentation dans l’art classique, peut être appelée représentation organique.

Or les raisons que Woringer trouve dans l’art, vous n’avez qu’à les déplacer, c’est exactement les mêmes raisons que celles des philosophes. La forme du vrai est liée fondamentalement à la représentation organique c’est-à-dire à cette information de l’âme par la forme. Voila, on en a fini avec le dur – plus jamais c’était pour poser simplement cette histoire de la forme du vrai, mais remarquez que c’est embêtant hein, parce que dès le début si vous m’avez suivi, on a une arrière pensée c’est que c’est très bien tout ça, c’est très beau hein, mais que cette forme du vrai défini par l’universel et le nécessaire et bien plus par une universalité et nécessité de droit, cette activité organique, elle prend pour modèle quoi ? Elle prend pour modèle l’Eternel, elle est fondamentalement frappée du sceau de l’Eternel.

Si vous lâchez le temps dans cette vérité là, qu’est ce que ça va devenir cette vérité là ? Est-ce qu’ils ont lâché le temps dans cette vérité là ? comment ils l’auraient pas fait ? Encore une fois ils sont pas idiots, oui ils ont lâché le temps dans cette vérité là et dans cette conception de la vérité et quand ils ont lâché le temps dans cette conception de la vérité, qu’est ce qui leur est arrivé ? Comme on dit quelque chose leur est tombé sur la tête, et ils sont tombés dans une série de paradoxes que déjà les grecs maniaient et qu’ils n’ont cessé de se répercuter jusqu’au 18eme siècle, non jusqu’au 17eme, ou jusqu’au 18eme, mais tout ça on peut pas le voir maintenant.

Je passe à ma seconde remarque, très bien, je ne retiens de ce qui précède – j’avais besoin de tout ce qui précède – mais je ne retiens de ce qui précède que les deux points suivants :

→ dans une conception dite classique du vrai, il s’agit de distinguer le réel et l’imaginaire, le danger c’est-à-dire le faux tel qu’il est assumé par l’erreur, le faux étant la confusion du réel et de l’imaginaire ou de l’essence et de l’apparence ou de la représentation et de la modification. Ca c’est le point de vue de la forme organique du vrai. Voila c’est mon résumé.

(Voix 00.54.08-01.00.49)

[contents]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bibliography

 

Deleuze, Gilles. 1983. “Course 1983.11.08.” Part 1 of 2. Cinema / Vérité et temps – La puissance du faux. Nov.1983/Juin. 1984. Cours 45 à 66. Transcript by Farid Fafa. Web. Université Paris 8, Vincennes / Saint-Denis: La voix de Gilles Deleuze en ligne.

Audio and transcript at:

http://www2.univ-paris8.fr/deleuze/article.php3?id_article=260

Audio specifically at:

http://www2.univ-paris8.fr/deleuze/IMG/mp3/08_11_83_1.mp3

 

Audio also at:

 

Deleuze, Gilles. “Course 1983.11.08.” (Course 1). Vérité et temps, le faussaire : année universitaire 1983-84. Web. Gallica / Bibliothèque nationale de France.

http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k128239x

    [Note, recordings at both sources are identical.]

 

 

Or if otherwise cited:

 

Dupréel, Eugène. 1948. Les Sophistes. Protagoras, Gorgias, Prodicus, Hippias. Neuchâtel: Griffon.

 

Smith, Daniel. 2012. Essays on Deleuze. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University.

 

Worringer, Wilhelm. 1920. Form Problems of the Gothic. New York: Stechert.

PDF available online at:

http://www.archive.org/details/formproblemsofth00worruoft

 

 

.

No comments:

Post a Comment